Improving communication
and understanding through
engaging visuals that
increase impact and retention

Connecting the Dots…

By sharing our vision with others, we multiply the ideas, resources and opportunities possible than just by living our vision alone. I experienced this first hand as a publisher for the arts and continue to seek out learning opportunities in every person and situation I have the good fortune to find myself with.

The recent EuViz conference in Berlin was a space created for those working as visual thinkers, practitioners, and facilitators to come together, share their visions, and connect the dots—across the industry, within the practice, and inside ourselves.

It was a powerful experience, heightened by the opportunity to learn from the elders: Ulric Rudebeck, Lynn Carruthers, Reinhard Kuchenmueller, and David Sibbet.

image

 

“If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

–Isaac Newton

This idea has also traced back to the 12th century French Neo-Platonist Philosopher, Bernard of Chartes.

Pictured above is a digital sketchnote I created it on my iPad mini (compliments of Rocketpics) using Adobe Ideas—a vector-based drawing app. Luckily for this one, I had a front-row seat.

I find digital sketchnoting a very fulfilling technique. Sketchnoting itself heightens listening and retention. Practicing on the iPad increases the rate of creative problem-solving by engaging both sides of the brain at a rapid pace. But for me combining the two forces me to be acutely aware of what is happening in the room energetically and noticing what’s going on with me physically—noticing body posture, repetitive motions, energetic reflexes and responses. The best way I can describe it is that I’m connected viscerally, intellectually, and energetically with what is happening within and around me. David Sibbet sometimes simplifies the analogy to simultaneously patting your head and rubbing your belly. A challenge for sure, but also a intense experience when you practice being in the flow.

These leaders have carried the work for decades through their practices and advocations. It’s up to all of us working with visuals to carry it forward and to keep connecting the dots.

To learn more about what happened at the EuViz conference, you can see updates at: EuViz.com/harvesting.

Life Transition Underway

Another beautiful day in Durango.
I first arrived on the scene the summer of 1992, waking up on a Greyhound bus to my first view of the San Juan mountains (my first mountain experience). For a flat-land Kansas girl, I knew I found my new home. Little did I know at that time I would gain so many friendships and experience.

Durango is an accepting community where ideas are embraced, passion can be expressed, and success comes to those who are willing to do the work and keep the long-game in mind.

Thank you friends for your interest, support, an inspiration. I look forward to returning again and again and hope that when I do, I can reconnect with those who visited the sale and reached out to me via email, phone, and social media.

Thank you Southwest Colorado!

To read more about how giving back to the arts community is going to propel me going forward…

http://durangoherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?aid=%2F20140529%2FARTS%2F140529467&template=mobileart

Hermes Creative Award :: Humbly Announcing a Recent Win

image

If you are a frequent follower of my blog, then you may recall my most recently published scribe video case study here.

If you are a designer and you are familiar with the Hermes Awards, you know that:

Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of traditional materials and programs, and emerging technologies.

Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, PR firms, graphic design shops, production companies, web and digital creators and freelancers.

This year brought in over 5,500 entries. So it’s a big deal that the co-created scribe earned two gold Hermes creative awards. I would like to personally thank the NAEA creative team: Deborah Reeve, Dennis Inhulsen, and Krista Brooke; the Hermes judges and all the viewers who take the time to check out the new generation of art standards scribe video for the National Arts Education Association. Click here to view the video.

5 Core Skills of Disruptive, Visual-Thinking Innovators

stanfordbusiness:

“Visual thinking is the foundation for being creative and solving some of the most complex problems,” explained author and founder of Innovation Studio Lisa Kay Solomon. Solomon and Emily Shepard of The Graphic Distillery discussed the key role of visual thinking in innovation at a recent

5 Core Skills of Disruptive, Visual-Thinking Innovators #graphicfacilitation

raquelbenmergui:

neuromorphogenesis:

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension
Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks — research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Walk into any university lecture hall and you’re likely to see row upon row of students sitting behind glowing laptop screens. Laptops in class have been controversial, due mostly to the many opportunities for distraction that they provide (online shopping, browsing Reddit, or playing solitaire, just to name a few). But few studies have examined how effective laptops are for the students who diligently take notes.
“Our new findings suggest that even when laptops are used as intended — and not for buying things on Amazon during class — they may still be harming academic performance,” says psychological scientist Pam Mueller of Princeton University, lead author of the study.
Mueller was prompted to investigate the question after her own experience of switching from laptop to pen and paper as a graduate teaching assistant:
“I felt like I’d gotten so much more out of the lecture that day,” says Mueller, who was working with psychology researcher Daniel Oppenheimer at the time. “Danny said that he’d had a related experience in a faculty meeting: He was taking notes on his computer, and looked up and realized that he had no idea what the person was actually talking about.”
Mueller and Oppenheimer, who is now at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, conducted a series of studies to investigate whether their intuitions about laptop and longhand note-taking were true.
In the first study, 65 college students watched one of five TED Talks covering topics that were interesting but not common knowledge. The students, who watched the talks in small groups, were either given laptops (disconnected from Internet) or notebooks, and were told to use whatever strategy they normally used to take notes.
The students then completed three distractor tasks, including a taxing working memory task. A full 30 minutes later, they had to answer factual-recall questions (e.g., “Approximately how many years ago did the Indus civilization exist?”) and conceptual-application questions (e.g., “How do Japan and Sweden differ in their approaches to equality within their societies?”) based on the lecture they had watched.
The results revealed that while the two types of note-takers performed equally well on questions that involved recalling facts, laptop note-takers performed significantly worse on the conceptual questions.
The notes from laptop users contained more words and more verbatim overlap with the lecture, compared to the notes that were written by hand. Overall, students who took more notes performed better, but so did those who had less verbatim overlap, suggesting that the benefit of having more content is canceled out by “mindless transcription.”
“It may be that longhand note takers engage in more processing than laptop note takers, thus selecting more important information to include in their notes, which enables them to study this content more efficiently,” the researchers write.
Surprisingly, the researchers saw similar results even when they explicitly instructed the students to avoid taking verbatim notes, suggesting that the urge to do so when typing is hard to overcome.
The researchers also found that longhand note takers still beat laptop note takers on recall one week later when participants were given a chance to review their notes before taking the recall test. Once again, the amount of verbatim overlap was associated with worse performance on conceptual items.
“I don’t anticipate that we’ll get a mass of people switching back to notebooks,” says Mueller, “but there are several new stylus technologies out there, and those may be the way to go to have an electronic record of one’s notes, while also having the benefit of being forced to process information as it comes in, rather than mindlessly transcribing it.”
“Ultimately, the take-home message is that people should be more aware of how they are choosing to take notes, both in terms of the medium and the strategy,” Mueller concludes.


For all life long learning!

Take handwritten notes for better retention. And add visuals while you’re at it!

raquelbenmergui:

neuromorphogenesis:

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks — research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Walk into any university lecture hall and you’re likely to see row upon row of students sitting behind glowing laptop screens. Laptops in class have been controversial, due mostly to the many opportunities for distraction that they provide (online shopping, browsing Reddit, or playing solitaire, just to name a few). But few studies have examined how effective laptops are for the students who diligently take notes.

“Our new findings suggest that even when laptops are used as intended — and not for buying things on Amazon during class — they may still be harming academic performance,” says psychological scientist Pam Mueller of Princeton University, lead author of the study.

Mueller was prompted to investigate the question after her own experience of switching from laptop to pen and paper as a graduate teaching assistant:

“I felt like I’d gotten so much more out of the lecture that day,” says Mueller, who was working with psychology researcher Daniel Oppenheimer at the time. “Danny said that he’d had a related experience in a faculty meeting: He was taking notes on his computer, and looked up and realized that he had no idea what the person was actually talking about.”

Mueller and Oppenheimer, who is now at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, conducted a series of studies to investigate whether their intuitions about laptop and longhand note-taking were true.

In the first study, 65 college students watched one of five TED Talks covering topics that were interesting but not common knowledge. The students, who watched the talks in small groups, were either given laptops (disconnected from Internet) or notebooks, and were told to use whatever strategy they normally used to take notes.

The students then completed three distractor tasks, including a taxing working memory task. A full 30 minutes later, they had to answer factual-recall questions (e.g., “Approximately how many years ago did the Indus civilization exist?”) and conceptual-application questions (e.g., “How do Japan and Sweden differ in their approaches to equality within their societies?”) based on the lecture they had watched.

The results revealed that while the two types of note-takers performed equally well on questions that involved recalling facts, laptop note-takers performed significantly worse on the conceptual questions.

The notes from laptop users contained more words and more verbatim overlap with the lecture, compared to the notes that were written by hand. Overall, students who took more notes performed better, but so did those who had less verbatim overlap, suggesting that the benefit of having more content is canceled out by “mindless transcription.”

“It may be that longhand note takers engage in more processing than laptop note takers, thus selecting more important information to include in their notes, which enables them to study this content more efficiently,” the researchers write.

Surprisingly, the researchers saw similar results even when they explicitly instructed the students to avoid taking verbatim notes, suggesting that the urge to do so when typing is hard to overcome.

The researchers also found that longhand note takers still beat laptop note takers on recall one week later when participants were given a chance to review their notes before taking the recall test. Once again, the amount of verbatim overlap was associated with worse performance on conceptual items.

“I don’t anticipate that we’ll get a mass of people switching back to notebooks,” says Mueller, “but there are several new stylus technologies out there, and those may be the way to go to have an electronic record of one’s notes, while also having the benefit of being forced to process information as it comes in, rather than mindlessly transcribing it.”

“Ultimately, the take-home message is that people should be more aware of how they are choosing to take notes, both in terms of the medium and the strategy,” Mueller concludes.

For all life long learning!

Take handwritten notes for better retention. And add visuals while you’re at it!

ACT Applied to Marketing

image

Many artists come to me for advice about marketing. It’s such a big subject that I use the Art Career Theorem (ACT) model to simplify the subject and create actionable steps for success. The primary areas of marketing is defining your brand, customizing your message, and identifying your outlets.

The graphic recording above is from a recent ACT meetup where participants of the ACT workshop were invited to attend for free. The purpose of the meetup was to take deeper dives on topics of interest to them. Every meetup is different and customized to the artists’ needs.

In addition to marketing, in just two hours, we covered goalsetting, getting clarity, change approach, the Yes/No Meter, building relationships with the press, fear of failure, and shared resources relevant to the conversation.

See? Marketing isn’t so hard! It just needs to be distilled down into sizable chucks that can be broken down even further for easy execution.

Ever heard of the saying, “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.”?

You can get the marketing support you need by applying the ACT model.

ACT :: Tips on Saying “No”

image

Saying no is one of the hardest things to do. I personally have to practice it everyday. The Yes/No meter has been a very effective tool, but I’ve been working on it for years. It is a process so please be patient with yourself.

We all want to say “yes”—it feels good! But what happens when we say yes when we really mean no? It can make us feel bad, guilty, or full of regret because we intend for it to go well, but sometimes it does not.

For example, I tend to say yes because I like to hear other people’s ideas and I want to be part of their process to help them manifest their vision. But more often than not, I find myself overbooked and can’t take on more work. Or worse, I say yes to a project because I’m not busy and could use the money. What usually follows is that I discover that I’m not that passionate about the project after all, don’t do my best work, and then another project comes up that I want to say yes to, but I’m not available to meet the need and can’t.

So what do I do to practice saying no? I recognize triggers, create buffers and use a specific criteria to determine if I want to take on a new project.

I share my tips in detail with ACT participants, but if you would like a copy of my tips and tricks, please click here to email me. I would be happy to share the handout of tips and techniques on what works for me.

To learn more about how you can create and sustain the art career/life you want, you can keep up to date by checking out posts about ACT by clicking here.

1 of 9
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...


    Back to Homepage